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In this section of the site you have access to a number of external articles and reports which we believe you will find of interest. Use the side bar menu to find items in each particular area. Click on the link and the item will open in a new window.

 

If you have any items you think should be added to this area, please e-mail Cerys Llewellyn at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

"This is the third report of the Hampton-Alexander Review and on the main measures we use, progress is encouraging. The number of women on FTSE 100 boards has exceeded 30% for the first time, there are more women on the boards of the FTSE 250 companies and women on FTSE 100 Executive Committees has passed 21%, again for the first time ever."  - Sir Philip Hampton, Chair Hampton-Alexander Review.

This report assesses the current extent and manner of reporting by FTSE 350 companies on diversity at board and senior management levels in their annual reports. The findings provide a snap shot of diversity reporting across the FTSE 350, as at 1 March 2018, and show how this has changed over time. The report also identifies examples of reporting that lead the way in terms of quality, in some cases providing real insight into their approach.

It’s the new corporate board ideal, a board composed of directors of all different ages, ethnicities, and genders, each with unique expertise to help guide the organization to new heights.But for all the good a diverse board can bring, a new study by a trio of professors says that it can have a surprising—and serious—side effect: corporate deadlock. 

To provide a picture of the continuing evolution of European boards, Heidrick & Struggles has inaugurated Board Monitor Europe, a projected series of annual reports designed to provide profiles of new independent directors and track changes in those profiles in the coming years.

With the corporate environment evolving in significant ways, many S&P 500 companies have added younger directors to their boards to respond to new business needs. This report from PWC encourages you to take a closer look at your board composition to see if more age diversity would bring value to your company.

It’s 20 years since the first woman became chief executive of a FTSE 100 company. After Marjorie Scardino took over as CEO of Pearson others followed and now there are six female chief executives and six female chairs of FTSE 100 companies. It’s still not enough, but things are changing.

A report by Cranfield School of Management has criticised the lack of progress in improving gender diversity at the highest executive echelons of FTSE 350 companies. Despite progress in female representation on non-executive board positions, the report identifies the lack of women in executive roles on boards of the UK’s leading companies.

This report discusses what makes a board of directors 'diverse'. For many years, discussions about board diversity have focused primarily on issues of gender, race, and ethnicity. Studies show that there has been some improvement in gender and racial diversity on boards however progress has been slow. 

In a 48-page detailed analysis, experts from the school’s International Centre for Women Leaders scrutinise data provided by the UK’s top 350 companies. The report has criticised the lack of progress in improving gender diversity at the highest executive echelons of FTSE 350 companies. Despite progress in female representation on non-executive board positions, the report identifies the lack of women in executive roles on boards of the UK’s leading companies.

 

Drawing on 20 years experience in this area, the Female FTSE Board Report's authors identify the leading players in gender diversity in the FTSE 100, and highlight those companies that are lagging behind the rest.

For the first time, Heidrick & Struggles expands their annual analysis of incoming board directors to Europe, tracking industry experience and diversity in gender and nationality, among other findings, in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

This independent review commissioned by the government, looks at ways to ensure that talented women at the top of business are recognised, promoted and rewarded. The Hampton-Alexander Review builds on the work of the Davies Review, aiming to increase the number of women on FTSE Boards with an important focus on improving women's representation in senior leadership positions.

For this new study, Korn Ferry went directly to female directors to learn about the opportunities as well as the barriers they have encountered in board service.

This Egon Zehnder article offers seven steps boards can take to successfully make diversity an integrated part of their agendas. 

Following on from their annual global survey of women in business, this brief Grant Thornton summary lists three main actions for businesses, governments and women in business to take in order to improve gender diversity in business leadership. 

After analysing the policies of all Fortune 500 firms over a ten year period, this study from the SAGE journal Human Relations in partnership with The Tavistock Institute finds that diversity in the boardroom is key to advancing and encouraging lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) inclusive policies. 

This 2016 ‘Working Paper’ from the Peterson Institute for International Economics examines the evidence taken from a global survey of 21,980 firms to explore whether or not gender diversity is profitable - whether the presence of women in corporate leadership roles may have a significant influence on improving a firm’s performance. 

This 2016 ‘Working Paper’ from the Peterson Institute for International Economics examines the evidence taken from a global survey of 21,980 firms to explore whether or not gender diversity is profitable - whether the presence of women in corporate leadership roles may have a significant influence on improving a firm’s performance. 

This report from Grant Thornton discusses, as it states in its title, the value of diversity and the argument from which their research shows that companies with diverse executive teams outperform their male-only run competitors. In a time where most of the S&P 500, the FTSE 350 and the Indian CNX 200 have a female board member, businesses have made progress in valuing the diversity of a board. However, most of these women are employed as non-executive directors rather than executives, and so this report investigates this ‘new source of energy’ that female executives and board members can both possess and offer a company.

This report, the second in Spencer Stuart’s two-part series, follows on from Part 1 in determining what tools they use to identify Cross-Cultural Agility. This report discusses the collaborative approach that the hiring manager, HR leader, and the executive must take in order to facilitate a successful international assignment. It also highlights the actions that must be taken by the organisation and the executive that, combined with open discourse, allow for long-term success.  

 

This report is the first in a two-part series from Spencer Stuart, where they have compiled the findings from a study on the chief causes for success and failure of executives positioned across borders. This series not only explores how organisations can identify with these leaders who possess cross-cultural agility, but also how both the organisations and executives can ensure long-term success in whatever role, both cross-border and beyond, making any international assignment more successful in the long run.

 

Heidrick and Struggles have published this report which looks at the changing number of women on boards since the launch of the Davies Report of Women on Boards, noting that the FTSE 350 boards have almost doubled the number of women board directors over the past four years. The report notes that as boards are now near meeting the challenge of improving the representation of women on boards, the next focus should be on enriching the talent pipeline and concentrating on more women being appointed to leadership roles. 

 

 

This report by Grant Thornton focuses on career paths in order to better understand the barriers to women’s progress into leadership roles. Drawing on 5,404 interviews in 35 economies and 20 in-depth interviews with senior business leaders, this report finds that the advancement of women in business is being constrained by a number of factors, from entrenched social norms and gender bias to parenthood and archaic business practices. 

Produced by Charlotte Sweeney Associates on behalf of the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills, this is a Voluntary Code for Executive Search Firms on how to increase the number of women put forward for board positions.

 

Heidrick & Struggles have produced this boardroom briefing, which explores issues that have been raised in their recent discussions with chairmen. It looks mainly at the importance of ‘diversity of thought’ and thinking style, explaining the differences between analytical, innovative, imaginative and relational thinking. 

This report by Harvey Nash presents the results of a survey conducted among non-executive directors and chairman, trying to establish the extent to which the role of the non-exec has changed over the past five years. Key findings include the suggestion that many new non-execs are unprepared for the role and that the influence of the ‘old boys’ network’ may be fading.

In this report, Criticaleye asks senior women business leaders what is being done to ensure future generations of executives and non-executives will be more diverse and inclusive as well as getting their views on the gender debate, diversity and where they believe the real, systematic problems lie. 

The list of barriers to female representation in management is analogous to the list of barriers to female labor force participation. Accordingly, Adams and Kirchmaier examine whether low female labor force participation is the main reason few women hold seats on corporate boards using data from 22 countries over the 2001-2010 period. Using a novel country-level measure of female participation on corporate boards, we show first that the representation of women on boards across countries is actually worse than most surveys suggest.

 

Throughout much of the 20th century, debate swirled around the proper role of women in the workforce. Increasingly, women earned wages -- but only rarely as professionals or salaried employees. As recently as the early 1960s, most women with college degrees and professional aspirations had to limit their aspirations and seek employment in the “pink ghetto” as nurses, secretaries, librarians or teachers. Then a wave of social change swept across the corporate landscape and society as women demanded and increasingly received more opportunities. Today, a female CEO may not be common but no longer is remarkably rare; women make up a large percentage of the workforce in most developed nations.

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